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  • predicate adjectives

    Can the hyphens be omitted in the phrases that follow the to-be verbs below? In other words, do the examples below look okay as is?

    The technology is state of the art.

    The software is cutting edge.

    The test was multiple choice.

    The exam was fill in the blank.


    Thank you.

  • #2
    Strictly a personal opinion, yes, they all look fine.
    . . . . . Pete

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    • #3
      Thank you.

      If anyone else has an opinion regarding no hyphens in these and agrees, please let me know.

      Your opinions are deeply valued.

      Thank you.

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      • #4
        I agree that no hyphen is necessary according to Margie (https://www.margieholdscourt.com/hyp...ng-adjectives/).
        Rebecca


        Proofreader/Virtual Assistant
        rebecca@veridicalsupport.com
        www.veridicalsupport.com

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        • #5
          Thank you. So, really, we never hyphenate after the verb.

          The purchase was tax free.
          The trip was ill fated.
          He was ill intentioned.
          She is soft spoken.
          He is old fashioned.
          It was tax exempt.
          He was well respected, well known, and well heeled.
          He was clean shaven and clear headed.
          The answer was crystal clear.

          Good to those too, without hyphens?

          Sorry for the copious examples!



          Thank you so much!
          Last edited by ljaxon; 02-12-2018, 04:15 PM.

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          • #6
            Based on Margie's post, I think so! The only time I might add hyphens is if I felt like it was clearer with hyphens for some reason. I can't think of an example off the top of my head, though.

            I don't think you can go wrong with supplying lots of examples!
            Rebecca


            Proofreader/Virtual Assistant
            rebecca@veridicalsupport.com
            www.veridicalsupport.com

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            • #7
              Thank you, Rebecca!

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              • #8
                In your second set of examples, a hyphen would often be needed.

                Gregg's 820 says to hyphenate noun + adjective whether before or after the noun: fat-free (same as tax-free).

                Gregg's 821 says to hyphenate noun + participle whether it appears before or after the noun: home-cooked.

                Gregg's 822 says to hyphenate adjective participle whether it appears before or after the noun: soft-spoken.

                Gregg's 823 says to hyphenate adjective + noun + ed whether it appears before or after the noun: clear-headed (same as clear-eyed).

                Some words have morphed to a single form, so be aware of that, like bullheaded, etc.

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                • #9
                  Thanks, Loopy!

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                  • #10
                    Strictly following Gregg’s advice (courtesy of Loopy), this is what I’ve surmised below:

                    (1) The technology is state of the art.
                    (No hyphen in “state of the art” here.)

                    (2) The software is cutting edge.
                    (No hyphen in “cutting edge” here.)

                    (3) The test was multiple-choice.
                    (Hyphenate “multiple-choice” after the verb “was” here because Gregg's 823 says to hyphenate adjective + noun + ed whether it appears before or after the noun:
                    clear-headed.)

                    (4) The exam was fill in the blank.
                    (Not sure what category “fill in the blank” fits in with respect to participles. Per Gregg, would you hyphenate it after the verb here?)

                    Do you agree with my hyphens/lack of hyphens in each above? I’ve numbered them for ease of response.

                    Thank you.
                    Last edited by ljaxon; 02-15-2018, 07:21 AM.

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