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  • Hyphenated?

    "It's Bates labeled 996."
    or
    "It's Bates-labeled 996."

    I've never seen it hyphenated before. Should it be?
    Gini
    "We could learn a lot from CRAYONS; some are sharp, some are pretty, some are dull, while others bright, some have weird names, but they all have learned to live together in the same box."

  • #2
    I always hyphenate it, same as Bates-stamped.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hm. I don't hyphenate "Bates stamped" if it's not followed by a noun, such as "Bates-stamped exhibit." The only examples I can find in my reference sources all show it followed by a noun and hyphenated.

      I hope others will jump in here.
      Gini
      "We could learn a lot from CRAYONS; some are sharp, some are pretty, some are dull, while others bright, some have weird names, but they all have learned to live together in the same box."

      Comment


      • #4
        Yes, I hyphenate Bates-labeled and Bates-stamped.
        Elsa


        Years ago my mother used to say to me -- she'd say, "In this world, Elwood, you must be" -- she always called me Elwood. "In this world, Elwood, you must be oh so smart or oh so pleasant." Well, for years I was smart. I recommend pleasant. You may quote me. [From the movie Harvey.]
        Left the CS CRF with 21364 posts.

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        • #5
          I found THIS.
          Gini
          "We could learn a lot from CRAYONS; some are sharp, some are pretty, some are dull, while others bright, some have weird names, but they all have learned to live together in the same box."

          Comment


          • #6
            This is from Morson's 148:
            RULE 148
            Generally, when two or more words are combined to form a compound adjective that
            expresses a single idea, these words are hyphened when they precede the noun
            they modify. The compound adjective that is formed may include several different
            parts of speech. When in doubt, consult a dictionary.
            d. I participated in a price-cutting scheme. (noun + participle before or
            after a noun) >SEE ALSO GREGG MANUAL RULE 821

            a Bates-stamped exhibit an exhibit that is Bates-stamped
            Elsa


            Years ago my mother used to say to me -- she'd say, "In this world, Elwood, you must be" -- she always called me Elwood. "In this world, Elwood, you must be oh so smart or oh so pleasant." Well, for years I was smart. I recommend pleasant. You may quote me. [From the movie Harvey.]
            Left the CS CRF with 21364 posts.

            Comment


            • #7
              edgecsr So then it should always be hyphenated?
              Gini
              "We could learn a lot from CRAYONS; some are sharp, some are pretty, some are dull, while others bright, some have weird names, but they all have learned to live together in the same box."

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Gini Smith View Post
                edgecsr So then it should always be hyphenated?
                Yes. I have it defined that way. I see arguments that it should only be hyphenated if it comes before a noun, but the rule, according to Morson and Gregg, is that it's always hyphenated. I don't know that Gregg specifically addresses "Bates-stamped," but Gregg does cover this as well.
                Elsa


                Years ago my mother used to say to me -- she'd say, "In this world, Elwood, you must be" -- she always called me Elwood. "In this world, Elwood, you must be oh so smart or oh so pleasant." Well, for years I was smart. I recommend pleasant. You may quote me. [From the movie Harvey.]
                Left the CS CRF with 21364 posts.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Looks like I need to change my ways.
                  Gini
                  "We could learn a lot from CRAYONS; some are sharp, some are pretty, some are dull, while others bright, some have weird names, but they all have learned to live together in the same box."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    No matter what, I think it's safe to assume that an attorney reading the transcript won't ever notice it and mutter to himself/herself, "Ah, look at how the reporter put a hyphen in there. I need to call the agency and let them know how wonderful that reporter is. Oh, and look over here how there is a beautiful semicolon. Wow! And I am so impressed that this reporter capitalized the brand-name drugs but left the generic ones all lowercase."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Moellaella View Post
                      No matter what, I think it's safe to assume that an attorney reading the transcript won't ever notice it and mutter to himself/herself, "Ah, look at how the reporter put a hyphen in there. I need to call the agency and let them know how wonderful that reporter is. Oh, and look over here how there is a beautiful semicolon. Wow! And I am so impressed that this reporter capitalized the brand-name drugs but left the generic ones all lowercase."
                      You are so right.
                      Elsa


                      Years ago my mother used to say to me -- she'd say, "In this world, Elwood, you must be" -- she always called me Elwood. "In this world, Elwood, you must be oh so smart or oh so pleasant." Well, for years I was smart. I recommend pleasant. You may quote me. [From the movie Harvey.]
                      Left the CS CRF with 21364 posts.

                      Comment

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