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Decline in U.S. childhood mortality lags behind that of other wealthy nations

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  • Decline in U.S. childhood mortality lags behind that of other wealthy nations

    "Researchers studying childhood mortality rates in the United States and 19 economically similar countries over a half century report that while there's been overall improvement among all the countries, the U.S. has been slowest to improve.

    The researchers, who looked at data from 1961 to 2010, found that U.S. childhood mortality has been higher than all other peer nations since the 1980s. Over the 50-year study period, its "lagging improvement" has amounted to more than 600,000 excess deaths.
    .......
    Among the leading causes of death for the most recent decade, the researchers say, were premature births and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, or SIDS. Children in the U.S. were three times more likely to die from prematurity at birth and more than twice as likely to die from SIDS."


    The findings show that in terms of protecting child health, we're very far behind where we could be."
    Christopher Forrest
    Pediatrician, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia


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    https://hub.jhu.edu/2018/01/08/us-la...ood-mortality/



  • #2
    It's a very complex topic. The headline provokes surprise, but the reasons are very diverse, and some not clearly understood. Both economic and racial factors are involved, along with access to health care. There are also regional differences. Good article for a slow news day.
    Metpatpetet מתפתפתת
    אשרי אדם, מצא חכמה ואדם יפיק תבונה
    Proverbs 3:13

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Metpatpetet View Post
      It's a very complex topic. The headline provokes surprise, but the reasons are very diverse, and some not clearly understood. Both economic and racial factors are involved, along with access to health care. There are also regional differences. Good article for a slow news day.
      Aren't you bothered by the claim that the United State's lagging improvement has amounted to more than 600,000 excess deaths of children?

      I wonder, did you read the article?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Mel View Post

        Aren't you bothered by the claim that the United State's lagging improvement has amounted to more than 600,000 excess deaths of children?

        I wonder, did you read the article?
        It disturbs me quite a bit. But then, America's paranoia about giving all citizens a decent level of affordable health care [free if necessary] has disturbed me for a long time. And the lack of free, comprehensive antenatal care is part of the problem where pediatric deaths are involved.

        There are quite a few "wealthy, Western" countries who do not have the kind of population diversity that the US does, and this is a factor. Poor people of color are at greater risk of a number of diseases, from birth onwards, than, say, a fairly homogenous population of a Scandinavian country or one with some form of national health service. It is a fact that blacks and Hispanics are at greater risk for certain chronic conditions, even if they are in the higher economic percentiles. Health care facilities are also not evenly distributed throughout the US.

        Nearly all American immigrants to Israel, indoctrinated against "socialized medicine" for almost their entire lives until aliyah, are often amazed when they first encounter the Israeli system, which isn't utopian, but is much better than what most Americans can afford. Whether a system similar to ours could work in such a large country as the US is debatable, but we are as diverse as the US, if not more so.
        Metpatpetet מתפתפתת
        אשרי אדם, מצא חכמה ואדם יפיק תבונה
        Proverbs 3:13

        Comment

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