Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Poll: Can we classify aspects of psychology w/o also stigmatising and limiting them?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Poll: Can we classify aspects of psychology w/o also stigmatising and limiting them?

    How an autism diagnosis became both a clinical label and an identity; a stigma to be challenged and a status to be embraced: https://aeon.co/essays/the-intriguin...tism-diagnosis
    1
    No
    0%
    0
    Yes
    0%
    0
    Other, please comment
    100.00%
    1

  • #2
    It has become something of a mania to classify everything, which assumes that everyone can be slotted into a category. When two of my kids were diagnosed as dyslexic, I began realizing that in certain ways I probably was mildly so myself; my husband is more so. I am probably slightly autistic too, although I've never been formally diagnosed. I definitely require a LOT of personal space, am far happier in my own company than the company of most others.

    Whatever happened to just "being"? Some people have traits which severely impede their functioning; that's a serious matter. But nearly all of us have aspects which could be considered to fall into some "spectrum". So what? It's neither good nor bad, IMO. Human beings are diverse, thank heaven, or it would be a very boring world.
    Metpatpetet מתפתפתת
    אשרי אדם, מצא חכמה ואדם יפיק תבונה
    Proverbs 3:13

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Metpatpetet View Post
      It has become something of a mania to classify everything, which assumes that everyone can be slotted into a category.
      Different people fall at different points on the spectrum of tendency to classify.

      Whatever happened to just "being"?
      I suspect that part of it, in the medical context, is a need to find a justification for doing anything as treatment; to get paid for it. Or even defend the treatment to your peers or judges.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by mikeofallbirds View Post

        Different people fall at different points on the spectrum of tendency to classify.



        I suspect that part of it, in the medical context, is a need to find a justification for doing anything as treatment; to get paid for it. Or even defend the treatment to your peers or judges.
        Or to develop a medication for it.
        Metpatpetet מתפתפתת
        אשרי אדם, מצא חכמה ואדם יפיק תבונה
        Proverbs 3:13

        Comment


        • #5
          When people talk about a spectrum (autism is now "on the spectrum", instead of Asperger's, or whatever) it brings the bell curve to mind, for me, and the oddly limited way people think of it. Most folks look at it as two ends of extremes, and a middle ground where the majority can be found, but I look at it as more of a three-dimensional bell. Consider someone on, or close to, one side of the bell, then rotate the bell some value other than 180 degrees (which is where you end up if you use the standard bell curve) and you'll find someone else who is _not_ the opposite, or even relatedly different, but just as far from the "norm" in the middle.

          I know I'm somewhere around the edge of that, and most of the really interesting people I know are also closer to an edge than they are to the bulgy place in the middle.

          (image from wikipedia)

          Loren

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Mel View Post
            How an autism diagnosis became both a clinical label and an identity; a stigma to be challenged and a status to be embraced: https://aeon.co/essays/the-intriguin...tism-diagnosis
            I'm not sure I understand the question posed in the thread's title.

            Classifying and attaching a diagnostic label to a set of symptoms doesn't stigmatize anyone.

            It started many years ago with the goal of taking a scientific approach to what often were bizarre symptoms that were rationalized as superstitions; for example, the belief that evil spirits were inhabiting someone's body were instead understood as evidence of a disease which became known as "schizophrenia".

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Jim Odom View Post

              I'm not sure I understand the question posed in the thread's title.

              Classifying and attaching a diagnostic label to a set of symptoms doesn't stigmatize anyone.

              So your answer to the question is a yes. Thanks for that.

              Comment

              Working...
              X